booking around the twin cities

minnesota authors, bookish tidbits and literary events

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The Literary Tourist

(Source: bookingaroundtheusa)

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Booking it in Bloomington
When’s the last time you spent an afternoon discussing murder on the high seas, lake cabin love affairs and paranormal frontier adventures? Stories like these buzzed throughout the aisles of the 11th annual Writers Festival and Book Fair in Bloomington, Minn. on March 22. More than 75 published authors were on hand to discuss their work with potential readers. The event was a made-to-order literary cocktail of writing workshops, book fair, and networking fizz. Minnesota’s own children’s author and illustrator Nancy Carlson delivered the keynote speech, kicking off a day of workshops and panel discussions that covered the spectrum of a writer’s life from creative idea to published book. Missed the event? Check out some of the Fair’s authors online.

Booking it in Bloomington
When’s the last time you spent an afternoon discussing murder on the high seas, lake cabin love affairs and paranormal frontier adventures? Stories like these buzzed throughout the aisles of the 11th annual Writers Festival and Book Fair in Bloomington, Minn. on March 22. More than 75 published authors were on hand to discuss their work with potential readers. The event was a made-to-order literary cocktail of writing workshops, book fair, and networking fizz. Minnesota’s own children’s author and illustrator Nancy Carlson delivered the keynote speech, kicking off a day of workshops and panel discussions that covered the spectrum of a writer’s life from creative idea to published book. Missed the event? Check out some of the Fair’s authors online.

Filed under Bloomington Writers Festival and Book Fair Minnesota authors Nancy Carlson

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Revising Longfellow.
A picture is worth a thousand words, especially if you’re Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. A photo of Minnehaha Falls helped inspire his 1855 epic, “The Song of Hiawatha.” The storyline borrows from a mishmash of Native American legends, but its real roots are European romantic ideals. Although the poem is set in Minnesota Longfellow never visited the state or lived in the house near the falls that bears his name. A quarter century after his death, a Minneapolis businessman recreated the poet’s Massachusetts home in three-quarters scale. The Longfellow House Hospitality Center, operated by the Minneapolis Park Board, isn’t the only replica. In the early twentieth century, the Sears catalog sold blueprints reminiscent of the revered poet’s home and look-alike houses were constructed throughout the United States from Portland, Maine to Washington State.

Revising Longfellow.
A picture is worth a thousand words, especially if you’re Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. A photo of Minnehaha Falls helped inspire his 1855 epic, “The Song of Hiawatha.” The storyline borrows from a mishmash of Native American legends, but its real roots are European romantic ideals. Although the poem is set in Minnesota Longfellow never visited the state or lived in the house near the falls that bears his name. A quarter century after his death, a Minneapolis businessman recreated the poet’s Massachusetts home in three-quarters scale. The Longfellow House Hospitality Center, operated by the Minneapolis Park Board, isn’t the only replica. In the early twentieth century, the Sears catalog sold blueprints reminiscent of the revered poet’s home and look-alike houses were constructed throughout the United States from Portland, Maine to Washington State.

Filed under Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Minnehaha Falls Hiawatha Minnesota Minneapolis Massachusetts Minneapolis Park Board

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bookingaroundtheusa:

The Word on Main StreetThe presence of Sinclair Lewis is everywhere in Sauk Centre, Minnesota—in a small museum right off the highway, in street signs commemorating his legacy, in tours of the house where he grew up. The town embraces its native son with gusto but it wasn’t always that way. As a youth, his gawky demeanor often made him an outsider. The publication of his 1920 novel Main Street threw locals into a tizzy. Residents bristled at the book’s thinly-veiled scathing portrait of their hometown. Main Street was not Sinclair Lewis’s first novel, but it was the one that clinched his reputation. Lewis was on a roll throughout the Roaring Twenties, cranking out five more novels including Babbitt and Arrowsmith, and paving the way for a Nobel Prize in 1930. This feat brought honor not just to Sauk Centre but the entire country—Lewis was the first American to win the Nobel Prize in Literature.

THE PLACE: Sinclair Lewis Boyhood Home810 Sinclair Lewis AveSauk Centre, MN 56378Open May-Septemberhttp://www.sinclairlewisfoundation.com/boyhood_home/boyhood_home.htm

bookingaroundtheusa:

The Word on Main Street
The presence of Sinclair Lewis is everywhere in Sauk Centre, Minnesotain a small museum right off the highway, in street signs commemorating his legacy, in tours of the house where he grew up. The town embraces its native son with gusto but it wasnt always that way. As a youth, his gawky demeanor often made him an outsider. The publication of his 1920 novel Main Street threw locals into a tizzy. Residents bristled at the books thinly-veiled scathing portrait of their hometown. Main Street was not Sinclair Lewiss first novel, but it was the one that clinched his reputation. Lewis was on a roll throughout the Roaring Twenties, cranking out five more novels including Babbitt and Arrowsmith, and paving the way for a Nobel Prize in 1930. This feat brought honor not just to Sauk Centre but the entire countryLewis was the first American to win the Nobel Prize in Literature.

THE PLACE:
Sinclair Lewis Boyhood Home
810 Sinclair Lewis Ave
Sauk Centre, MN 56378
Open May-September
http://www.sinclairlewisfoundation.com/boyhood_home/boyhood_home.htm

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Literary Lodgings
The Commodore has had its share of notoriety—Ma Barker and John Dillinger can be counted among its past residents. Sinclair Lewis hung out at its bar. St. Paul’s most famous literary couple lived there, too. The brick building was brand spanking new when Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald breezed into town in the fall of 1921. The name had a familiar ring; they had honeymooned at the Commodore in New York. Although the St. Paul residence hotel was smaller, it boasted a tony address, a rooftop garden, dining room and other luxe conveniences. The couple stayed for a month as they awaited their daughter’s birth, then moved to more spacious digs on Goodrich Avenue. The family returned to the Commodore again in 1922, shortly before leaving Minnesota forever.

Literary Lodgings
The Commodore has had its share of notoriety—Ma Barker and John Dillinger can be counted among its past residents. Sinclair Lewis hung out at its bar. St. Paul’s most famous literary couple lived there, too. The brick building was brand spanking new when Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald breezed into town in the fall of 1921. The name had a familiar ring; they had honeymooned at the Commodore in New York. Although the St. Paul residence hotel was smaller, it boasted a tony address, a rooftop garden, dining room and other luxe conveniences. The couple stayed for a month as they awaited their daughter’s birth, then moved to more spacious digs on Goodrich Avenue. The family returned to the Commodore again in 1922, shortly before leaving Minnesota forever.

Filed under The Commodore St. Paul F. Scott Fitzgerald Sinclair Lewis Ma Barker John Dilinger John Dillinger Minnesota Minnesota History 1920s

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14 IN ’14: Literary Events on the Horizon in the Twin CitiesDid you make a resolution to get more involved with the local literary scene in 2014? In January alone, more than 14 bookish events are scheduled. Cut the procrastination by adding one of these to your calendar:
 2 JAN l Social Brief: Blank Slate Head over to the Walker Art Center to join local literati and art lovers for a poetry and printing party 6 JAN l Poetry Lovers Converge Poetry in the suburbs with an open mic event at Golden Valley Library 7 JAN l An inside scoop on e-books Local authors Lorna Landvik and Connie Claire Szarke share experiences from publishing’s new frontiers at the Edina Public Library 10 JAN l Mentor Mentality Listen up as Loft Mentor Peter Campion presents in the Open Book Peformance Hall 13 JAN l Virtual classroom Paragraph Party and Poetry Playhouse are just two of the online classes that start this week at the Loft 14 JAN l Everyone’s book club Books and Bars meets at Republic in Calhoun Square for a few swigs of beer and a lively discussion of The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle 15 JAN l Free writing workshop Unleash your creative muse with the help of Roseanne Bane, author of Around the Writer’s Block at this workshop at Subtext: A Bookstore 18 JAN l Revolver at the Ritz Come along with Heid Erdrich, Andy Sturdevant, Dylan Hicks and other local literati for crazy fun at this Revolver-sponsored event at the Ritz Theater 22 JAN l Join Andy at the Fireside The 20th season of the Fireside Literary Reading Series gets underway with Andy Sturdevant reading from his book, Potluck Supper with Meeting to Follow 22 JAN l A Night of Minnesota Mystery Two local mystery writers—Ellen Hart and Wendy Web—read excerpts from their novels at Common Good Books 24 JAN l Music, hors d’oeuvres, and wine Open Book is the place to be for the opening reception honoring 2014 Book Artist Award recipient Fred Hagstrom and his work, “Passage” 27 JAN l Witness to greatness The Literary Witnesses program kicks off its 15th year with a celebration of the genius of William Stafford at the Plymouth Congregational Church in Minneapolis 29 JAN l Burning truths The Fireside Literary Reading Series continues as Jack El-Hai discusses his new nonfiction book, The Nazi and the Psychiatrist 30 JAN l Party down Head over to the James J. Hill Reference Library as the local musicians, the Wolf Lords, rev it up for the return of Book It: The Party

14 IN ’14: Literary Events on the Horizon in the Twin Cities
Did you make a resolution to get more involved with the local literary scene in 2014? In January alone, more than 14 bookish events are scheduled. Cut the procrastination by adding one of these to your calendar:


2 JAN l Social Brief: Blank Slate
Head over to the Walker Art Center to join local literati and art lovers for a poetry and printing party

6 JAN l Poetry Lovers Converge
Poetry in the suburbs with an open mic event at Golden Valley Library

7 JAN l An inside scoop on e-books
Local authors Lorna Landvik and Connie Claire Szarke share experiences from publishing’s new frontiers at the Edina Public Library

10 JAN l Mentor Mentality
Listen up as Loft Mentor Peter Campion presents in the Open Book Peformance Hall

13 JAN l Virtual classroom
Paragraph Party and Poetry Playhouse are just two of the online classes that start this week at the Loft

14 JAN l Everyone’s book club
Books and Bars meets at Republic in Calhoun Square for a few swigs of beer and a lively discussion of The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle

15 JAN l Free writing workshop
Unleash your creative muse with the help of Roseanne Bane, author of Around the Writer’s Block at this workshop at Subtext: A Bookstore

18 JAN l Revolver at the Ritz
Come along with Heid Erdrich, Andy Sturdevant, Dylan Hicks and other local literati for crazy fun at this Revolver-sponsored event at the Ritz Theater

22 JAN l Join Andy at the Fireside
The 20th season of the Fireside Literary Reading Series gets underway with Andy Sturdevant reading from his book, Potluck Supper with Meeting to Follow

22 JAN l A Night of Minnesota Mystery
Two local mystery writers—Ellen Hart and Wendy Web—read excerpts from their novels at Common Good Books

24 JAN l Music, hors d’oeuvres, and wine
Open Book is the place to be for the opening reception honoring 2014 Book Artist Award recipient Fred Hagstrom and his work, “Passage”

27 JAN l Witness to greatness
The Literary Witnesses program kicks off its 15th year with a celebration of the genius of William Stafford at the Plymouth Congregational Church in Minneapolis

29 JAN l Burning truths
The Fireside Literary Reading Series continues as Jack El-Hai discusses his new nonfiction book, The Nazi and the Psychiatrist

30 JAN l Party down
Head over to the James J. Hill Reference Library as the local musicians, the Wolf Lords, rev it up for the return of Book It: The Party

Filed under Literary Minnesota Minneapolis Saint Paul Golden Valley Walker Art Center Lorna Landvik Connie Claire Szarke Peter Campion Roseanne Bane Heid Erdrich Revolver Andy Sturdevant Dylan Hicks Ellen Hart Wendy Web Fred Hagstrom Jack El-Hai

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Holiday BlyTwo days before Christmas in 1926, Laq qui Parle County got a new resident who came into the world bringing gifts of his own. Robert Bly, now 83, has spent decades flexing his talents as poet, translator, publisher and social change agent. Early in his career he sought to modernize poetry with his magazine The Fifties. People who submitted pieces not up to snuff received acrid rejection letters such as “These poems remind me of false teeth.” Bly, Minnesota’s first official poet laureate, has published more than 30 volumes of poetry including a National Book Award winner, The Light Around The Body. Ironically, his best-known work is not poetry. The New York Times Best Seller, Iron John: A Book About Men, established the mythopoetic men’s movement. The 83-year-old’s latest book, Stealing Sugar from the Castle Selected Poems, 1950–2011, was published in September.
Holiday poems by Robert Bly:A Christmas PoemDriving my Parents Home at Christmas

Holiday Bly
Two days before Christmas in 1926, Laq qui Parle County got a new resident who came into the world bringing gifts of his own. Robert Bly, now 83, has spent decades flexing his talents as poet, translator, publisher and social change agent. Early in his career he sought to modernize poetry with his magazine The Fifties. People who submitted pieces not up to snuff received acrid rejection letters such as “
These poems remind me of false teeth.” Bly, Minnesota’s first official poet laureate, has published more than 30 volumes of poetry including a National Book Award winner, The Light Around The Body. Ironically, his best-known work is not poetry. The New York Times Best Seller, Iron John: A Book About Men, established the mythopoetic men’s movement. The 83-year-old’s latest book, Stealing Sugar from the Castle Selected Poems, 1950–2011, was published in September.

Holiday poems by Robert Bly:
A Christmas Poem
Driving my Parents Home at Christmas

Filed under Robert Bly Minnesota Christmas poems Poetry

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Transforming Steel into BooksAndrew Carnegie had a real knack for making money but when he thought his wealth might be corrupting his character, he turned from the business of steel to the business of books—libraries to be specific. The Scottish industrialist-cum-philanthropist funded the building of 2,500 libraries across the world—65 in Minnesota alone. The Twin Cities received grants for 8 libraries; six are still operating as public libraries, including the Saint Anthony Park Branch Library that opened in 1917. The library, a well-loved landmark of the Saint Anthony Park neighborhood, has its own library association with volunteers who maintain a garden on the library grounds. Through the years, the library has received a few face lifts—the most recent in 2013—but has never lost its lovely beaux-arts charm.

Transforming Steel into Books
Andrew Carnegie had a real knack for making money but when he thought his wealth might be corrupting his character, he turned from the business of steel to the business of books—libraries to be specific. The Scottish industrialist-cum-philanthropist funded the building of 2,500 libraries across the world—65 in Minnesota alone. The Twin Cities received grants for 8 libraries; six are still operating as public libraries, including the Saint Anthony Park Branch Library that opened in 1917. The library, a well-loved landmark of the Saint Anthony Park neighborhood, has its own library association with volunteers who maintain a garden on the library grounds. Through the years, the library has received a few face lifts—the most recent in 2013—but has never lost its lovely beaux-arts charm.

Filed under libraries Saint Anthony Park Saint Anthony Park Library St. Paul MN Andrew Carnegie Carnegie Library

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Mystery at the Fair.
Crime is alive and well in the Twin Cities, judging by the abundance of mystery writers at the Annual Local Author Fair in Apple Valley last Saturday. Not surprisingly, many of their stories have Minnesota connections:

  • A St. Paul homicide detective investigates the suspicious drowning of a war vet in Bone Shadows, the latest in Christopher Valen’s crime fiction series.
  • Twin Cities book club friends work together to help a 96-year-old woman locate her missing son in Barbara Deese’s Spirited Away.
  • A Mendota County social worker retreats to the north woods only to stumble across a sinister plot to steal oil and gas rights in Burnt Out by Susan Koefod.

The fair, sponsored by the Dakota County Library, also featured a smorgasbord of other writing genres including historical fiction, romance, memoir, local history and children’s literature. In addition to meeting local writers, fair goers could bone up on their writing skills at mini-workshops.

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Bibliomaniac HeavenWhat does a brick-and-mortar bookstore have that Amazon doesn’t? When it comes to Magers & Quinn, the answer is “lots.” To be precise, more than a quarter million books you can thumb through, on the spot. It’s no surprise that Magers & Quinn is also Minnesota’s largest independent bookstore. The Uptown location sprawls across two buildings—a former thrift store and a 1920s Chevrolet dealership—and has been a browser’s heaven for almost 20 years. The shelves overflow with a wide range of new and used books ranging from rare century-old collectible editions to the latest best-selling paperbacks. Better yet, Magers & Quinn hosts dozens of events with local and national authors, some of which are available for replay on the store’s own YouTube channel.

Bibliomaniac Heaven
What does a brick-and-mortar bookstore have that Amazon doesnt? When it comes to Magers & Quinn, the answer is lots. To be precise, more than a quarter million books you can thumb through, on the spot. Its no surprise that Magers & Quinn is also Minnesotas largest independent bookstore. The Uptown location sprawls across two buildingsa former thrift store and a 1920s Chevrolet dealershipand has been a browsers heaven for almost 20 years. The shelves overflow with a wide range of new and used books ranging from rare century-old collectible editions to the latest best-selling paperbacks. Better yet, Magers & Quinn hosts dozens of events with local and national authors, some of which are available for replay on the stores own YouTube channel.

Filed under Magers & Quinn Minneapolis Uptown bookstore